Newsletter No 23 (February 2000)

COSEELIS
Newsletter

Council for Slavonic and East European Library and Information Services

ISSN 0966-999x No. 23 February 2000
Contents

A brief note from the Editor
Hungary at the 51st Frankfurt Book Fair
Update on International Slavic Librarians’ Conference in Tallinn
Survey of Baltic collections in UK Libraries
FSU Serials for 2000
Report of a visit to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Minutes of the Annual Meeting held at Fitzwilliam College, University of Cambridge, on 9 April 1999
Message from Dr. Gregory Walker from the Bodleian Library
Index of Newsletters
A brief note from the Editor

I hope that you have all enjoyed the festive celebrations and have welcomed in the new millennium.

The Coseelis Newsletter has finally changed it’s logo and I hope that you all find it acceptable. I have found that contributions to this Newsletter are hard to get hold of so I am asking you to think about what could be included in the next one.

If you are missing any of the previous Newsletters then have a look on the newly designed web page:

http://www.lib.gla.ac.uk/COSEELIS

This has been constructed by Tania Konn and Annie Hall, who are more than willing to listen to any constructive feedback:

Glasgow University Library
Hillhead Street
Glasgow
G12 8QE Fax: 0141 330 4952
Tel: 0141 330 6735
e-mail: T.Konn@lib.gla.ac.uk
or : A.Hall@lib.gla.ac.uk

If anyone has any contributions for the web page then please let either Annie or Tania know.

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Hungary at the 51st Frankfurt Book Fair

In celebration of her first Millennium and on the way to joining the European Union, this year Hungary, the first country from Eastern Europe was guest of honour at the 51st Frankfurt Book Fair. The Hungarian presence, placed Hungarian literature, culture in its widest sense, and knowledge of the country in the limelight for the duration of the Fair. It was a unique opportunity for Hungarian publishers and booksellers to display the state and quality of their book industry in one of the leading countries of the European Union.

Hall 3.housing the 300 sqm. Hungarian pavilion was the scene of numerous exhibitions of Hungarian history, literature, music, science, but, most importantly, provided over 60 Hungarian publishing houses access to the Fair. All this was accompanied by an extraordinary variety of cultural events presented simultaneously, at hourly intervals throughout the five days. Most of the round-table discussions took place in the ‘Café Pest-Buda’, an intimately lit and furnished mock café, reminiscent of traditional venues for literary gatherings. They included highly topical debates on Hungarian literature beyond the borders, featuring authors from Slovakia, Burgenland, Transylvania; émigré Hungarian literature around the world, printing houses at the turn of the century, Culture in Central Europe, to name but a few.

The best of the Hungarian literary events, however, took place at the prestigious Frankfurt Literaturhaus, outside the boundaries of the book fair. It offered a hearty welcome to Imre Kertész, Péter Nádas and Péter Esterházy – the trio of well- established fame, but also introduced leading authors: Lajos Parti Nagy, Imre Oravecz, Pál Závada whose works have only selectively been translated into major European languages. György Dalos, István Eörsi, György Konrád, László Krasznahorkai, recently joined by the highly acclaimed Ádám Bodor, Sándor Tar, Endre Kukorelli, needed no introduction to the German audience. Fortunate to have found themselves German publishers, they benefited from the advantages of western public relations and therefore had an easier journey towards international recognition.

To the librarian/book selector, of the numerous bibliographic tools offering a cross-section of the otherwise baffling output, three publications appeared very helpful.

Hungarian Publishing. Ungarisches Verlagswesen, 1999, by Dóra Károlyi (ed.), Frankfurt: Frankfurt ’99 Kft, 1999 -offers a bilingual survey of Hungarian publishing history, followed by a concise historical presentation of Hungarian publishing houses, in alphabetical order, their field of interest, with contact names, electronic and postal addresses. The most useful section of this listing without doubt is: Hungarian Publishers abroad, chiefly in neighbouring Romania, Slovakia, Yugoslavia and Ukraine. Until the early 90s most of these countries relied on no more than one publisher for their Hungarian language output. It is heartening to note that Romania now has six, in addition to the still largest Kriterion, previously the token publisher of national minorities. The volume concludes with a list of Foundations and Unions, Literary Agencies, aiming to sponsor publication of works by new authors, protect, represent writers’ interests, support publications of Hungarian literature abroad and advertise new titles.

Neuerscheinungen, New Titles, Nouveaux Titres – translated from Hungarian 1999, by Dóra Károlyi (ed.), Frankfurt: Frankfurt ‘99Kft, 1999. The order is predictable; the largest number of works were translated into German, the smallest into French, arranged in subject order of literature, art, history, cultural history, social sciences, other, with short summaries and bibliographic descriptions.

The third volume is the exhibition catalogue: Books on Hungary, compiled by Rosmarie Rauter, AuM, with the assistance of Simone Bühler, Frankfurt, 1999. It covers 1150 books presented by 395 publishing houses from thirty countries on the occasion of the focal theme ” Hungary without Boundaries” at the 51st Frankfurt Book Fair, 1999. For future reference the volume thoughtfully provides a list of publishers and their addresses.

All three publications will significantly broaden the selector’s horizon and offer a variety of possibilities for more comprehensive acquisition.

Despite the Hungarian presence at this year’s Frankfurt Book Fair, emphasised by excellent performances of folk music and dance, visual art exhibitions including a spectacular review of artists’ books, concerts, theatre- and film shows, Hungary played a relatively small part in the context of the universal publishing scene. Alas, I was not able to visit much of the rest, but as curator of the Romanian collections, I decided to survey the Romanian stand in Hall 9.2

It was an impressive turnout. Some forty publishing houses offered a display of 12000 publications under the auspices of the Romanian Ministry of Culture. In view of the Hungarian focus, Hungarian books occupied a large section of the show. The catalogue: Books from Romania, October 13-18, 1999, compiled and published by the Ministry of Culture, introduces new publishing houses, lists foreign books in Romanian, and a small number of Romanian works in English translation. Of the independent exhibitors Humanitas still appears to be the most professionally accomplished Romanian publisher. The books on display: scholarly works and essays in the humanities and social sciences, reference works are listed in a clearly arranged and well executed catalogue with a subject index and a useful general index of publications between 1990-1998.

It was good to witness the animated debate of authors, publishers and enthusiastic bibliophiles, to meet and renew old acquaintances with fellow librarians or members of the book trade, in a colourful and stimulating atmosphere.

Bridget Guzner

For books from Hungary see the “Bookfinder” Database at:
http://www.bookfinder.hu
http://www.konyvkereso.hu
http://www.corvina.hu

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Update on International Slavic Librarians’ Conference in Tallinn, Estonia, 26 – 28 July 2000 and the ICEES VI World Congress in Tampere, Finland, 29 July – 3 August 2000

More information is now available about both the above conferences. For the Tallinn Conference registration information and forms can be found via the conference website: http://www.rusin.fi/iccees/library.htm

At the time of writing a draft programme was not yet available, but by the time you read this it should have been mounted at the same URL as above. Subject to confirmation, there will be UK participation in panels on collection development issues, Baltic collections outside the Baltic states, Slavic and East European librarianship journals and a roundtable on the COCOREES project. The conference will be held at the National Library of Estonia and there will be the opportunity to visit other Tallinn libraries. Transport will be arranged for those wishing to travel on to the ICCEES VI World Congress in Tampere, Finland which takes place immediately afterwards.

To give you an idea of likely costs, registration for Tallinn will cost ca. £35.00 before May 1 2000 and ca. £47.00 after May 1 2000. Hotel rooms in Tallinn per night cost between £37.00-£57.00 single and.£47.00- £67.00 double. Travel between Tallinn and Tampere will cost ca. £16.00. Registration for Tampere costs ca £100.00 before 31 March 2000 and ca. £120.00 after this date. Tampere hotel rooms cost between £35.00-£75.00 single and £48.00-£100.00 double.

The programme and registration details for the ICCEES Congress in Tampere are available via the website: http://www.rusin.fi/iccees/index.htm

There will be UK participation in the following library-related panels:

Slavonic collections in Western libraries: history of their formation (Organizer: Christine Thomas(BL); Chair: Raymond Scrivens(Cambridge UL); Panelists: Mikhail Afanasyev , Robert Davis (New York Public Library), Janet Zmroczek (BL), Discussant: Christine Thomas)

Publishing in Russia and Central and Eastern Europe after10 years of the market economy: experiences and future prospects (Organizer & Chair: Janet Zmroczek(BL); Panelists: Grzegorz Boguta (PWN Publishers, Warsaw); Tatiana V. Boulanina & Dmitri M. Boulanin (Institute of Russian Literature (Pushkinskii Dom), Russian Academy of Sciences) , Agnes Gulyas (Canterbury Christchurch University College); Discussant: Vera Ebels-Dolanová.(Fund for Central and East European Book Projects, Amsterdam )

Russian literature archives (Chair: Richard Davies (Leeds Russian Archive); Panelists: Larissa Ivanova (Pushkinskii Dom, Russia), Elena Obatnina (Pushkinskii Dom, Russia), Tatiana Tsarkova (Pushkinskii Dom, Russia); Discussant: Tanya Chebotarev (Bakhmeteff Archive, USA)

If anyone would like to have more information, but does not have internet access, please contact me and I will be happy to forward information to you.

Janet Zmroczek
Slavonic and East European Collections
British Library
96 Euston Rd
London NW1 2DB Tel: 020 7 412-7586
Fax: 020 7 412-7554
E-mail: janet.zmroczek@bl.uk

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Survey of Baltic collections in UK Libraries

In connection with the panel I have organised for the Tallinn Library conference on Baltic Collections outside the Baltic region, with the subscription renewal notices, I have circulated to all institutional members a questionnaire on Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian collections in UK libraries. It will also be going to a number of other libraries and community organisations which have collections of Baltic materials. If anyone can suggest any libraries which currently collect or have substantial holdings of material from Estonia, Latvia or Lithuania, and which are not COSEELIS members, I would be very grateful.

I know that we are all extremely busy and that a number of surveys are being conducted within a sort space of time, but I would be extremely grateful if you can find the time to complete this questionnaire. Not only will your responses contribute to the first comprehensive review of Baltic collections in UK libraries, but Gregory Walker has agreed that the data gathered can be used for the COCOREES project, so you will not be asked to duplicate the information. If you can only answer some of the questions, please just do as much as you can. If you have no collections relating to the Baltic in your institution I would appreciate notification by e-mail of a nil return.

Thank you.

Janet Zmroczek
Slavonic and East European Collections
British Library
96 Euston Rd
London NW1 2DB Tel: 020 7 412-7586
Fax: 020 7 412-7554
E-mail: janet.zmroczek@bl.uk

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FSU Serials for 2000

I compared the Year 2000 subscription prices of 500 serials from the countries of the former Soviet Union for the British Library’s collection. Because of the balance of the BL’s collection, there were proportionally more scientific and medical titles than would appear in most collections in Britain but humanities titles were also costed as part of the excercise. There were very few newspapers. The list of titles is Russo-centric but titles from the other FSU republics were also included, with the largest proportion of those being Ukrainian items.

Seven suppliers were compared. These were in alphabetical order: East View Publications (EVP), Kubon + Sagner (K+S), Mezhdunarodnaia Kniga (MK), Panorama of Russia (POR), Rospechat’ (Rosp), Russian Press Services (RPS), Victor Kamkin (Kamkin).

Most of the prices were taken from their catalogues, with three firms providing advance copies by e-mail before the publication of the hard-copy version.

The situation of the early 1990s in which different suppliers provided cover from different geographical areas seems to have altered for the better. Most of the suppliers are now covering almost all of the FSU, although K+S are still the only one to cover all of Eastern and Central Europe as well. EVP lists a few Bulgarian titles. MK does not list any Georgian titles and Rosp does not list any from non-CIS countries (i.e. the Baltic States) or Armenia. RPS lists some titles about Russia, mostly literary journals, published in other countries.

Of the 500 titles, 3 ceased publication in the latter half of 1999 and so were not quoted by anybody. Any one of the firms was not able to supply all of the titles. The largest ‘cover’ was by EVP – which has always had the ‘largest title selection … over 5,000 periodicals’ as it says in the introduction to the 2000 Periodicals Catalog which only arrived in hardcopy in January. I was sent a tab delimited ASCII file of the draft version in September which was actually more helpful as it had subject descriptors which are not in the published version!

EVP listed 480 of the 497 remaining titles. The other suppliers listed 460 (Kamkin), 457 (K+S and MK), 444 (POR), 411 (RPS) and 243 (Rosp). The 457 listed by K+S and the 457 listed by MK were not quite the same 457.

The Rosp 243 (sic, not 423!) was a great surprise. Rosp lists quite a lot of titles which just are not listed by anybody else but has huge gaps even in the Russian Federation list. Unlike all of the others, Rosp actually says, “Subscriptions shall only be taken to periodicals included in this catalogue,” in the introduction to Russian Newspapers & Magazines 2000 the “Rospechat” Agency. The others either remain silent and will at least try to obtain unlisted items or, in the case of POR, actually state, “This catalog includes the most popular periodical titles.

If you do not find a publication you want, we can order it for you,” in Panorama of Russia 2000 Periodicals Catalog. EVP had issued a similar listing limited to the most popular titles in 1999, but the 2000 listing is a full one.

Average (arithmetic mean) prices per title before discount from the suppliers were as follows (all prices in US Dollars as per normal with FSU publications, K+S converted from Deutschmarks at the November 1999 rate of US $1.00 = DM 1.86). EVP $206.41, Kamkin $198.48, Rosp $188.69, POR $187.31, MK $181.14, K+S $176.51, RPS $151.96. The ‘average of the averages’ price was $184.36 per title.

Discounts are of course available from some firms, so that for instance EVP’s average price drops to $165.13 when one subtracts the 20% offered on the first page of its catalogue for any order of 20+ titles. Most firms are far less open about their discount rates and one needs to negotiate with them, often at great length, to obtain some measure of value for money.

EVP in 1993 had the lowest prices of any supplier of FSU publications, even before discount. It now has the highest average price. At its discounted prices it looks more competitive but most of its rivals also give discounts of course… EVP’s average undiscounted 2000 price was $18.39 more expensive than the 1999 average undiscounted price.

MK says that “Prices for most titles do not exceed prices of 1999 and in some cases we managed to reduce prices” in Catalogue of Periodicals 2000. They of course do not actually say that they also increased prices for some of the titles on the list but the 2000 average before discount for the 497 remaining titles was $4.40 cheaper than in 1999.

K+S froze their scientific list prices at the 1999 level, which was unfortunately still rather high. K+S do seem to be approaching the prices that their rivals offer, however, and seem to be shedding their past reputation of being ‘very expensive’.

Rosp had some titles at amazingly low prices and some at amazingly high ones. It all depended what you wanted!

Kamkins had raised their general price level for 2000 instead of keeping level with MK. In 1999 most Kamkins and MK Russian Federation titles had had exactly the same list price.

RPS had a good list with fairly low prices for most items. They are of course better known for monograph supply but good reports on their recent performance with serials from Peter Hellyer of the BL in London among others persuaded me to ask for their catalogue. I was glad that I did.

POR, another firm probably better known for monograph supply, offered very fair prices for its serials but unfortunately for them kept getting undercut by one of the others for nearly every title.

The maxim that there are lies, damned lies and statistics still holds true. Just because Company A is offering journal X at a lower price than Company B and at an even lower price than Company C, it certainly does not follow that journal Y will have the same price profile. Quoting at a median level means that Company C can get undercut for every title in succession by either Company A or Company B and the other can turn about and charge more than Company C for every item. Company C can maintain a much lower average price compared with both the others because Company C only just gets undercut on the under bids but the overbids are truly massive. Company C will not get the order, however, as the wise customer will just order the cheap ones from Company A and Company B in turn and reject Company C’s ‘second lowest each time’ prices as well as the overbid items. With seven companies it is not so simplistic but title by title costing proved not only useful but necessary.

Prices, as ever with FSU serials, are seemingly plucked at random from thin air on a title by title basis. Even the publications of the Nauka publishing house, which had had the same price from everybody for many years because of exclusivity arrangements, now have different prices from company to company. Exclusivity seems to have disappeared with products such as the Letopisi of the Rossiiskaia Knizhnaia Palata, now renamed for trading purposes only as Book Chamber International. Once exclusively distributed by EVP, with whom it shares its building, BCI’s specialized titles are now on everybody’s list.

As you have to look at all the prices to find the average, you can simultaneously look at the prices to find the best supplier for each title as outlined previously. Considerations of service, known performance in providing manageable invoicing, the granting of credit for ceased titles, supplying missing issues, the ability to provide backsets. speed of response to orders and queries, etc., also come into play of course.

Six titles were only available by direct purchase from the publishers. MK was able to offer the best price for most titles followed by RPS. EVP maintained probably the most cost effective service for Ukrainian periodicals – as it has had in previous years – and so picked up a substantial rather Ukrainian-heavy order. K+S gained a smallish order for FSU publications but we do use them for titles from the rest of Eastern Europe as well. Kamkin also gained a small part of the order.

If we had carried on using the same suppliers for 2000 as for 1999, we would have had to pay 18.32% more for the same titles. This is in spite of the fact that some of the firms were holding prices fairly level. By mixing and matching the order, we in fact had to pay ‘only’ 9.27% more which is much more in line with World serial price inflation.

I have by now (February 2000) accumulated price listings and catalogues from no less than 31 separate potential vendors, many of them dealing with niche markets of course. Some publications in the specialised ‘VUZ” market of higher educational establishment journals and scientific institute reports seem to be making a reappearence after their vast decline from 1992 onwards. They are reappearing in the main listings and also attracting specialist vendors. Two I am watching with interest are:

Informnauka Ltd.
20, Bld. 2, Usievicha Str.
125219, Moscow
Russia
Tel: 7-095 152 5481
Fax: 7-095 152 5481

E-mail: alfimov@viniti.msk.su

Kone Liga-Press
Of. 319, Lubiansky pr. 5,
Moscow 101000
Russia

Tel: 7-095 928 3958
Fax: 7-095 928 0486

E-mail: askone@dol.ru

It may well be that Russian serial publication has not only survived the economic crises but is getting back to its former level. Tirages are certainly down, but the number of titles is on the rise once more. We must, however, as always wait and see.

Ron Hogg
Slavonic Eastern & Central European Acquisitions
British Library Boston Spa

ron.hogg@bl.uk

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Report of a visit to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies 31st National Convention, St Louis, November 1999

I was invited to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), by the Mortenson Centre for International Librarianship and the American Bibliography for Slavic and East European Studies/Illinois Researcher Information Service(ABSEES/IRIS). The people in these departments will be known to many of you, by name if not in person: Marianna Tax Choldin is Director of the Mortenson Center and Aaron Trehub runs the ABSEES/IRIS office.

I was fortunate to visit at the same time as Mikhail Afanasev of the Russian State Historical Library of Russia and Ekaterina Geneva of the Foreign Literature Library in Moscow, President of the Soros Foundation, Russia. We all gave well-attended lectures and talks and there were several receptions constituting a very full `Slavic’ week. Katia Geneva gave the 10th Mortenson Distinguished Lecture entitled `Whither Russia: the role of libraries in the transformation of a society’. Misha Afanasev and I gave more informal talks, his entitled: `Kuda ischezaiut bibliotechnye knigi: `spisanie’, `iz’iatie’, `prodazha’ i `obmen’ v sovetskikh bibliotekakh’, full of interesting anecdotes from his own experiences, mine entitled `Into the 21st century: Slavonic studies and Slavonic librarianship in the UK’.

UIUC Library has the third largest Slavic and East European collection in North America. The head of the Library is Bob Burger. Larry Miller is in charge of acquisitions and Helen Sullivan runs the Slavic Reference Service. Such are the strengths of the collections and the expertise of the reference team that the Library receives additional federal funding for the Reference Service which serves more non-governmental researchers in the Slavic field than any other institution in the country, except for the Library of Congress. Helen and her team handle approximately 250 requests per month of which currently, approximately 50% are requests for technical help with websearching, using Cyrillic and other Slavic fonts etc. The service is available to anyone and Helen was keen that I should publicise it here in the UK. To find out more the URL is: http://www.library.uiuc.edu/spx/srs.htm. She would like to develop closer links with major Slavonic reference collections in the UK with a view to establishing cooperative projects.

The Slavic and East European Library has more than 638,000 printed volumes, 92,000 microforms, and subscriptions to approximately 4,000 current periodicals. It covers all parts of the former Soviet Union as well as Poland, the Czech Republic, the Slovak Republic, Bulgaria, the former Yugoslavia, Hungary, Romania, and Albania. The collection is particularly noted for its holdings in Russian and Ukrainian history and culture and includes the personal collection of Elias Czaykowsky on Ukrainian culture and the library of the Russian historian George Vernadsky.. The I. Perlstein Collection of Czechoslovak Book Design contains approximately 750 volumes of limited, signed bibliophile editions of Czech literature from the 1920s and 1930s..

Since 1973, the Slavic and East European Library has been the focal point of the University of Illinois’s Summer Research Laboratory on Russia and East Europe which draws participants from all over the world. A workshop for librarians is an integral part of the programme and any future participants from the UK would be warmly welcomed.

Since 1977, the Slavic and East European Library has cooperated with the Slavic Department of the Helsinki University Library in selecting and microfilming rare 19th and early 20th century books in the Helsinki collection and making them available to the international scholarly community. It has complete runs of the most important 19th and 20th century Russian periodicals and newspapers on microfilm, microfiche, or in the original and significant holdings of microfilms of Russian books from the 17th and 18th centuries from major Russian repositories, and the Russian book, periodical, and newspaper collections of the Hoover Institution, Harvard University, Columbia University and the Library of Congress. It also holds on microfilm many complete runs of Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Serbian and Bulgarian historical, literary, political, and philological journals from the 19th century and first half of the 20th century

I also met Maria Gorecki-Nowak, managing editor of The American Bibliography of Slavic and East European Studies (ABSEES), the American counterpart to EBSEES.. ABSEES has been compiled continuously since 1956 under the auspices of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies (AAASS). The bibliography covers North American scholarship on Eastern Europe, Russia, and the former Soviet Union. It contains bibliographic records for journal articles, books, book chapters, book reviews, dissertations, and selected government publications. The online version of ABSEES is available to colleges, universities, and libraries for an annual subscription fee. For more information see: http://www.library.uiuc.edu/absees/

From UIUC a long drive across the prairie took me to St Louis for the 31st National Convention of AAASS, the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies. For more information about the organisation and its conventions see: http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~aaass/

It was initially something of a culture shock, though also a tremendous thrill, for someone used to the altogether more modest and intimate BASEES/COSEELIS conferences to arrive in the grand lobby of the conference hotel thronged with hundreds of Slavists. AAASS has approximately 5000 members of which well over 1000 seemed to be in attendance. It was however quite easy to meet up with the other Slavic librarians at library-related panels and meetings, the largest of which were attended by ca. 50-75 people. Topics under discussion were largely familiar ones and included restitutions, new sources for Slavic reference, both printed and electronic, use of approval plans for collection development and émigré collections in US libraries. I also took the opportunity to attend a number of academic panels on Poland and Central and Eastern Europe. Subjects covered were history and historiography, regional identities, and the Jewish question in Poland. There was also the opportunity to meet a large number of commercial vendors and to peruse their wares in the exhibition hall.

I found it particularly useful to be able to see the output of both large and small North American university presses. I also attended the business meetings of the Bibliography and Documentation Committee which were very worthwhile for getting to know about the nuts and bolts issues facing our North American counterparts. I was given a short slot in which I gave an outline of COSEELIS activities and reported on developments in the COCOREES project.

I found it truly uplifting to feel part of the larger international community of librarians and information specialists. It was very useful for me to make new contacts and discuss common problems with a wider range of colleagues in the Polish field. Our American colleagues are very welcoming and keen to know about our problems, challenges, projects etc. I sensed a general concern on their part about the pressures to redefine the role of Slavic studies and Slavic librarianship in the post-Cold War environment in order to secure future funding.

After AAASS I spent a few days in Chicago, where I paid a brief visit to the Newberry Library and fortuitously bumped into the compiler of a recent catalogue of their Lituanica holdings. I also visited the Regenstein Library at the University of Chicago and was given a tour by June Pachuta Farris and Sandra Levy. June, the Slavic Bibliographer, is probably known to many of you as the compiler of the extremely useful listings of new reference materials. For more information see: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/su/slavic/

Although the expense is clearly an inhibiting factor,(I was fortunate enough to have my attendance at AAASS largely funded by UIUC), I firmly believe that if we could manage to have COSEELIS representatives attending AAASS on a more regular basis, there could be many positive outcomes, particularly in terms of concrete cooperative projects. I would strongly urge anyone who can find the funding to make the trip – you are guaranteed a very warm welcome from our North American colleagues.

Janet Zmroczek
Curator of Polish and Baltic Collections
British Library

E-mail: janet.zmroczek@bl.uk

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COSEELIS annual subscription renewals 1999 – 2000 and Register of member’s interests

Renewal notices for the new subscription year, January to December 2000 were sent out in the first week of February to personal members and the named official contact for institutional members. If any named official contact or personal member has not received the notice, please contact me at the address below. At the AGM in March we agreed to the change of the subscription year to a calendar year. Once again I am making my usual plea that all members should endeavour to send me their cheque for subscription and the completed membership records form by the closing date of March 6, 2000.

Thereafter I will send only one reminder, after which anyone who still fails to pay the subscription will be removed from the mailing list and will no longer receive the Newsletter and other COSEELIS mailings. I’m sorry for the stern approach but each year I spend a considerable amount of time chasing a few non-payers. Please remember to make the cheque payable to COSEELIS not the British Library.

Please can you also let me know of any changes to entries in the Register of member’s interests1998-9. (If you sent in corrections at the time when I distributed the Register last year, you don’t need to repeat them). In the case of institutional members, please could the named official contact undertake to inform me of any changes to the details of individuals within the institution. Later in the year I will send out a revised version of the Register.

Janet Zmroczek
Treasurer, COSEELIS
c/o British Library
96 Euston Rd
London NW1 2DB Tel: 020 7 412-7586
Fax: 020 7 412-7554
E-mail: janet.zmroczek@bl.uk

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If you have any comments to make about the Newsletter then please do not hesitate to contact me and if there are any pieces of information you wish to include in the next COSEELIS Newsletter send them to me whenever possible.
Editor:
Nicola Deal, Slavonic Acquisitions, The British Library, Boston Spa, Wetherby, LS23 7BQ, Tel: (01937) 546214,
Fax: (01937) 546333,
E-mail: nicola.deal@bl.uk

© COSEELIS. Views expressed in this Newsletter are not necessarily those of COSEELIS.